My co-presenters Sue Beckingham, Neil Withnell, Chris Rowell and Deb Baff at last year’s SocMedHE16If the twitter hashtag (#SocMedHe17) I followed today was anything to go by, the 3rd Annual Social Media in Higher Education conference, held today at Sheffield Hallam University, was a great success.

I made a twitter moment and a Storify story (plus archive) of the event, but from my remote vantage point, the highlights were:

I went last year and I hope to go next year. I just need something to present!

Extra: Scott Turner made a TAGS database of #SocMedHE17.

Archiving Tweetchats – Experiment 1

If you take a TAGS file (I used this one: BYOD4L 2016-2017 (@cpjobling)) and sort it in time order, you can then copy column Q (status_url) and paste the data into the HTML view of a WordPress page or Post to get a similar archive to that which @Storify produces.

Unfortunately, there seems to be a limit (on hosted WordPress at least) and only the first N tweets are shown (where N is to be determined). If there are more than N, only the links are shown. Also, retweets will need to be romoved from the data because they are not shown correctly.

(There is a bug in TAGS, the HTTPS protocol has to be used for WordPress to embed a tweet, but Martin records HTTP in the status URLs … A simple fix.)


How to archive your Storify stories on GitHub pages

Yesterday, Storify announced the retirement of its Storify service. This leaves a lot of users, including myself, with Storify stories linked into their blog sites and nowhere to host them when the service closes. Storify has provided an export feature, which can output a whole Storify store as a static HTML5 webpage, and GitHub provides a way to host static websites via its free GitHub pages feature. I, therefore, yesterday tweeted about a proof of concept trial:

Today, I’ve created a simple video to show how it was done.

I’ll be archiving my own collection of stories over the next few days and updating the links on this blog. To see my collection, visit cpjobling.github.io/stories.

This solves the problem for historical tweetchats. We, as a community, now need to find a new way to curate our future chats!

#ALTC Winter Conference – Day One

2017-12-12_09-39-20Today, was day one of the 2017 ALT Winter Conference (#altc) and I was supposed to chair the 10:00 am session “The Great Sussex Podblast” to have been delivered by Pete Sparx, George Robinson and Tab Betts from Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) at the University of Sussex. Unfortunately, problems with the Conference Webcasting platform (Blackboard Collaborate Ultra) and it’s back up (Blackboard Collaborate Classic) meant that the session had to be cancelled. Hence, my first opportunity to moderate a webcast of any kind passed me by! The guys did, however, create a video, slides (bit.ly/podblast-altc) and you can hear the Podblast podcasts here: soundcloud.com/teachingwithtech/sets/great-sussex-podblast-digital.

In other events, there were five tweet chats. I was able to participate in VLE Minimum Standards—Lessons from the Sector (hashtag: #UCISAVLE) and watch the
#altc blog showcase (hashtag: #altcshowcase).

I then had a meeting to attend so I will need to catch up with the other sessions via the webinar recordings and wait for the storify versions of the tweetchats:

I will have more time tomorrow to attend the live sessions.

#OpenEdMOOC Week 1

2017-10-10_1838Though signed up to the EdX Course in good time, I’ve only just today, already half-way through week 2, gotten around to exploring the resources and activities for Week 1 of George Siemens’ and David Wiley’s (or is the attribution the other way round) open course on an Introduction to Open Education (hashtag #OpenEdMOOC).

On first viewing, the structure is interesting. The course is available as an xMOOC (with the possibility of an optional certification) on the EdX platform. In this version, there are weekly exercises, that are assessed  — I’ve missed the deadline for the first one — and the usual mixture of text, video, readings and discussion. This version will cease to be available, shortly after the course ends, unless the $59 certification fee is paid by the end of October. But there is also an xMOOC version, made available under a CC BY licence at URL linkresearchlab.org/openedmooc, with largely identical content.

So my initial question is why did George and David chose to present their course on Open Education in a format that is “Open” only in the sense of free to register and also in the form of an Open Education Resource that satisfies Wiley’s 5Rs that come up in week 3. Another question that will be interesting to reflect on later, is where will the most useful course discussions take place? In the walled garden of the discussion boards on EdX (analogous to an institutional VLE) or in the wider network?

Personally, I expect to remain at least one week behind, so I already know that I’m likely to find the xMOOC version of the course more accessible. I also expect most of my contributions to be made via this blog and any discussion to take place on Twitter.